About Us
History of San Beda

The story of San Beda College in Manila is richly wedded to the narratives of the Roman Catholic Church, Western civilization, and the Philippines' journey as a nation.

 

San Beda College (El Colegio de San Beda) was established in 1901 by monks of the Ordo Sancti Benedicti (OSB) or Order of St. Benedict, also known as the Benedictines. Its founder, Benedict was born in the Umbrian town of Nursia, near Spoleto, Italy, in the waning years of the Roman Empire, AD 480. He hailed from a well-established family and was believed to have a twin sister, Scholastica.

 

As a scholar in Rome, Benedict knew and appreciated the splendours of Roman culture. But he was disillusioned with the worldliness around him and found inspiration in Christianity which was slowly expanding its roots. Eventually, he fled to the mountains of Subiaco where he lived in a cave as a hermit known only to the holy monk Romanus who provided him with food and clothing. After undergoing a deep spiritual experience, Benedict soon became renowned for his holiness and attracted some followers. He established twelve monasteries at Subiaco and founded the Monastery of Monte Casino, a place about 80 miles Southeast of Rome. In this monastery, he wrote the Holy Rule, Regula Sancti Benedicti, an embodiment of the balance between prayer and work (Ora et Labora), and lived at Monte Cassino until his death on March 21, around 547 A.D.

The Abbey of Monte Cassino became the cradle of the Benedictine Order. From this great monastery, the Benedictine Order spread far and wide, becoming one of the chief formative factors in the development of the New Europe. The Benedictine monks became the pioneers of Christian civilization, preaching the Gospel, preserving the Scriptures and other sacred writings of the Church as well as other classical literary treasures, serving the poor and sick, and teaching religion and various crafts to the young. Their influence from the 6th to the 13th century was so great that historians called this period the "Benedictine centuries" and St. Benedict is acclaimed as the "Father of Western Monasticism". In 1964, Pope Paul VI declared St. Benedict as the “Patron of Europe.”

Benedictine Monks, 1985
Abbey of Monte Cassino

Amidst the gathering storm of anti-clerical and native uprisings against Spain, the first group of Benedictine fathers and brothers came to the Philippines in 1895 from the Benedictine Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat in the Cataluña region of Spain primarily to undertake agricultural and missionary work in Surigao in Mindanao. They were the latest of the European Catholic orders to come to the Philippines and the first Benedictines to do their mission work more than halfway around the world. Undaunted by the brewing Philippine revolt, the Abbot of Montserrat, Rev. Fr. Jose Deas y Villar, OSB sailed to Manila with 13 young Benedictine Monksmonks from the Colegio de Misioneros de Ultramar and founded the Benedictine community in Mindanao from which grew the roots of Benedictine tradition and influence in the Philippines. They did their work quietly but meaningfully in the Mindanao hinterlands where aside from their pastoral work, they ran schools given to them by the Jesuits and taught the natives the mysteries of the Faith as well as music, arithmetic, Spanish grammar, ethics, geography, history and elementary science.

 

Fr. Juan SabaterNotwithstanding the crumbling Spanish political order and the growing hatred for the Spanish friars in the islands, the Benedictines kept to their vows. Paradoxically, they considered this critical period as a propitious time to be in the Philippines where they were winning adherents and their work was warmly appreciated. Hence, in the middle of the Katipunan revolution, on the 14th of August 1897, Rev. Fr. Juan Sabater, who was appointed superior of the Philippine Benedictine community, opened the Chapel of Our Lady of Montserrat in Manila.

Anticipating the potential influence of public schools established by the American government and the American Protestant missionaries, then Superior Fr. Juan Sabater, OSB, with the support of the Benedictine community, decided to open up a school and appropriately named it after the great English Benedictine scholar and saint, the Venerable Bede.

Benedictine Monks, 1985
Abbey of Monte Cassino

On June 17, 1901, at six o'clock in the morning, the school's first Rector, Fr. Silvestre Jofre, celebrated the Mass for the opening of El Colegio de San Beda in Arlegui St, Manila and dedicated the school to the cause of Catholic education and the formation of Christian gentlemen committed to excellence and service of God and country. San Beda College commemorates the feast of St. Bede, its patron saint, on the first week of the school year. The school is attached to the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat, founded from the Abbey of Montserrat in Cataluña, Spain.

 

The school's original curricula were composed of Primaria Enseñanza and Secundaria Enseñanza y Comercio. The Primaria Enseñanza consisted of Class Infirma, Media and Superior, the equivalent of the first grades of the present elementary system. The Secundaria Enseñanza was made up of the four years of high school and the first two years of college leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree and a course leading to a Diploma in commerce

 

On January 24, 1906, the Pontifical University of Sto. Tomas agreed to recognize all courses offered by San Beda College. In 1910, San Beda was granted government recognition and the authority by the American colonial government to confer the degree of Bachelor of Arts and diplomas for the Elementary and High School. These were San Beda College's starting years—marked by vision and aspiration, challenge and response. The spirit of Saint Benedict enflamed the missionaries of Montserrat to do the unorthodox, moving ahead swiftly with their cause for education in a period characterized by the chaos and confusion of an anti-clerical and nationalist revolution, war between an old world empire and an emerging new world power, and the challenge of Protestantism brought about by the American occupation.

Decade after decade, through times of war, heroic struggles for independence, economic crises, political turmoil and social changes in the Philippines as well as internal campus strife, San Beda College has quietly pressed for creation, re-creation, adjustments, re-adjustments and expansion. San Beda College and the Benedictine community have remained steadfast in nurturing and strengthening the Catholic faith, pushing boundaries of excellence and possibilities in Philippine education, and building the Philippine nation.

Benedictine Monks, 1985
Abbey of Monte Cassino
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About Us
VISION - MISSION
San Beda College, a Catholic educational institution, is committed to the Christian formation of the Bedan Community as its service to the Church, the Philippine society, and the world.
Vision
San Beda College envisions a Community that is:

 

  • Fully Human
  • Wholly Christian
  • Truly Filipino
  • Globally Competitive
San Beda College - Vision
Mission
San Beda College aims to form its members in:

 

  • Faith (Fides)
  • Knowledge (Scientia)
  • Virtue (Virtus)
and inculcate in them the Benedictine core values of prayer and work (ora et labora) that include:

 

  • Study
  • Community
  • Pursuit of Peace
San Beda College - Mission
The Ten Hallmarks of Benedictine Education
1. Love of Christ and neighbor
2. Prayer: A life marked by liturgy, lectio and mindfulness
3. Stability: commitment to the daily life of this place, its heritage and tradition
4. Conversatio: the way of formation and transformation
5. Obedience: a commitment to listening and consequent action
6. Discipline: a way toward learning and freedom
7. Humility: knowledge of self in relation to God, others and creation
8. Stewardship: responsible use of creation and arts
9. Hospitality: openness to the other
10. Community: call to serve the common good
Institutional Objectives
1. Benedictine Identity, Mission, Culture
Foster a Christian community of prayer, work and peace founded on faith, knowledge and virtues.
2. Leadership, Administration, and Governance
Cultivate transformative leadership and governance.
3. Relevant Curriculum Programs
Provide relevant curricula aligned with San Beda College's Vision-Mission Identity as well as with local and international standards.
4. Teaching Excellence
Deliver quality instruction through teaching excellence by competent faculty.
5. Resource Materials and Facilities
Utilize upgraded resource materials and facilities for effective learning.
6. Quality and Relevant Research and Intellectual Contribution
Build a culture of innovative research for knowledge advancement.
7. High Involvement in Extension Services
Engage the Bedan community in transforming lives.
8. Efficient Student Services
Render responsive services for holistic student development.
9. External Linkages
Harness value-adding linkages in local and global educational cooperation.
10. Recognition and Accreditation
Offer accredited programs and services for quality assurance.
About Us
RECTOR'S MESSAGE

A little over 1000 days ago, I took on the helm of San Beda College with a focused determination to drive the college to where the rest of world is going in pursuit of academic excellence and genuine service to the world. With the steadfast support of my brothers in the Benedictine community and the college administrators, I am happy to report that, in the past three years, we have prepared the building blocks for the college as it faces a completely different landscape compared to what we first saw in May of 2010.

 

Today, we are confronted with the challenge of a revolutionalized basic education system that impels us to rethink our vision for and formation of our young students.

 

Indeed, the relationship between our basic education program in our Rizal campus and our higher education program in Manila may have to be less than the seamless continuum that we got used to for many years.

We certainly have turned around the college in relation to its reputable standing among peer colleges and universities. The Philippine Accrediting Association of Schools, Colleges and Universities (PAASCU), in its interim visit in late 2011, gave highly positive observations on the substantive improvements and promising initiatives made by the college, particularly in the College of Arts and Sciences. San Beda College is poised to further expand its portfolio of program offerings while at the same time reinforcing its national reputation as a leading school for law, accountancy, entrepreneurship and liturgy.

 

In the aspect of academic reform, we have established the Academic Council as the highest policy making body on matters of quality assurance, thematic research agenda, faculty rank, tenure and promotion, and the school's long-term strategic directions. We have engendered a culture of accountability of academic departments and the service support units through requisite submissions of three-year action plans and regular, semestral accomplishments reports.

 

By expanding the portfolio of professorial chairs as well as grants for research, scholarship, travels for international and national conferences, and dissertation writing, we have bolstered research life among our faculty. The past three years have seen stepped-up engagements in research and academic conferences by faculty and students.

 

In good times and bad, especially those brought about by natural calamities, we have reached out to our less fortunate brethren, their families and communities, by mobilizing our students and faculty through our community involvement and outreach programs. Amidst unexpected turmoil, sadness and tragedy that rocked student life, we have remained united and steadfast in our total respect for life and value for peace by nurturing a genuine community for our students and educating them about the unnecessary risks brought about by inductions to fraternities.

 

Overall, while abiding to our time-honoured commitments to academic excellence, research, service to the community, and engagement with the world, we have tried to remain true to San Beda College's hallmarks of Benedictine education.

 

My administrators and I have built on its gains and strengths, corrected its weaknesses, explored opportunities, and ensured a firm grip on its journey to growth and transformation. And as we look back at our accomplishments for the past three years, I welcome you to the threshold of a new and stronger San Beda College.

 

Rev. Fr. Aloysius Ma. A. Maranan, OSB

Rector-President

About Us
ADMINISTRATORS
Office of the Rector-President
Fr. Aloysius Ma. A. Maranan, OSB
Fr. Aloysius Ma. A. Maranan, OSB
Rector-President
Office of the Vice Rector
Fr. Paul Ma. M. De Vera, OSB
Fr. Paul Ma. M. De Vera, OSB
Vice Rector (Rizal Campus)
Board of Trustees
Manuel V. Pangilinan
Manuel V. Pangilinan
Chairman of the Board
Fr. Aloysius Ma. A. Maranan, OSB
Fr. Aloysius Ma. A. Maranan, OSB
Vice-Chairman
Rev. Fr. Austin P. Cadiz, OSB
Rev. Fr. Austin P. Cadiz, OSB
Prior Administrator - Chancellor
Rev. Fr. Rembert C. Tumbali, OSB
Rev. Fr. Rembert C. Tumbali, OSB
Treasurer
Rev. Fr. Bede S. Hechanova, OSB
Rev. Fr. Bede S. Hechanova, OSB
Corporate Secretary
Rev. Fr. Paul Ma. A. De Vera, OSB
Rev. Fr. Paul Ma. A. De Vera, OSB
Rev. Fr. Angelo Ma. S. Legal, OSB
Rev. Fr. Angelo Ma. S. Legal, OSB
Rev. Fr. Ephraem Ma. E. Molina, OSB
Rev. Fr. Ephraem Ma. E. Molina, OSB
Rev. Fr. Aelred U. Nilo, OSB
Rev. Fr. Aelred U. Nilo, OSB
Dom Clement Ma. H Roque, OSB
Dom Clement Ma. H Roque, OSB
Robert G. Coyiuto, Jr.
Robert G. Coyiuto, Jr.
Roman Felipe S. Reyes
Roman Felipe S. Reyes
Ramon Ricardo A. Roque
Ramon Ricardo A. Roque
Ulpiano P. Sarmiento III
Ulpiano P. Sarmiento III
George T. Yang
George T. Yang
Office of the Vice Presidents
Fr. Rembert C. Tumbali, OSB
Fr. Rembert C. Tumbali, OSB
Vice President for Finance
Rev. Fr. Ephraem Ma. E. Molina, OSB
Rev. Fr. Ephraem Ma. E. Molina, OSB
Vice President for Administration
Dr. Josefina M. Manabat
Dr. Josefina M. Manabat
Vice President for Academics
Dr. Nomar M. Alviar
Dr. Nomar M. Alviar
Vice President for Research and Innovation
Dr. Tita A. Branzuela
Dr. Tita A. Branzuela
Vice President for Linkages and International Affairs
Academic Offices
Graduate School of Business
Dr. Ramon Ricardo A. Roque
Dr. Ramon Ricardo A. Roque
Dean
Graduate School of Law
Fr. Ranhilio C. Aquino
Rev. Fr. Ranhilio C. Aquino
Dean
Graduate School of Liturgy
Dr. Josefina M. Manabat
Dr. Josefina M. Manabat
Dean
College of Law
Atty. Virgilio B. Lara
Atty. Virgilio B. Jara
Dean
Atty. Marciano G. Delson
Atty. Marciano G. Delson
Vice Dean
College of Medicine
Dr. Fernandino Jose A. Fontanilla
Dr. Fernandino Jose A. Fontanilla
Dean
Dr. Noel D. Atienza
Dr. Noel D. Atienza
Vice Dean
College of Arts & Sciences
Dr. Christian Bryan S. Bustamante
Dr. Christian Bryan S. Bustamante
Dean
Dr. Joffre M. Alajar
Dr. Jackqui R. Moreno
Vice Dean - Accountancy and Business
Dr. Moses Aaron T. Angeles
Dr. Moses Aaron T. Angeles
Vice Dean - Arts, Humanities and Sciences
College of Nursing
Ms. Febes Catalina T. Aranas
Ms. Febes Catalina T. Aranas
Dean
Integrated Basic Education Department
Ms. Teresita T. Battad
Ms. Teresita T. Battad
Dean
Ms. Aurora L. Limcumpao
Ms. Aurora L. Limcumpao
Vice Principal - Senior High School
Ms. Remedios I. Pamo
Ms. Remedios I. Pamo
Vice Principal - Junior High School
Mr. Eduardo O. Casilla
Mr. Eduardo O. Casilla
Vice Principal - Grade School
Student Affairs
Dr. Tessie R. Da Jose
Dr. Tessie R. Da Jose
Dean
Other Offices
Fr. Aloysius Ma. A. Maranan, OSB
Fr. Aloysius Ma. A. Maranan, OSB
Director, Campus Ministry
Rev. Fr. Paul Ma. A. De Vera, OSB
Rev. Fr. Paul Ma. A. De Vera, OSB
Director, Institutional Learning Resources Office
Dr. Christian Bryan S. Bustamante
Dr. Christian Bryan S. Bustamante
Director, Governance and Quality Assurance Office
Ms. Maria Oliva S. Reyes
Ms. Maria Oliva S. Reyes
Registrar
Rev. Fr. Austin P. Cadiz, OSB
Rev. Fr. Austin P. Cadiz, OSB
Alumni Moderator
Prof. Gregorio G. Borja III
Prof. Jobe B. Viernes
Director, Strategic Communications Office
Ms. Liezel D. Rodriguez
Ms. Liezel D. Rodriguez
Director, Admissions and Placement Office
Prof. Jerry Anton C. Flores
Prof. Jerry Anton C. Flores
Director, Benedictine Mission and Identity Office
Prof. Joselito J. Tablang
Prof. Joselito J. Tablang
Director, Institutional Community Involvement Center
Prof. Joselito J. Tablang
Dr. Divina M. Edralin
Director, Research Development Center
Ms. Nenita A. Luna
Ms. Riza G. Baliang
Comptroller
Mr. Leonardo V. Alcantara, Jr.
Mr. Leonardo V. Alcantara, Jr.
Director, Human Resource Management Office
Ms. Liezel D. Rodriguez
Ms. Liezel D. Rodriguez
Director, Guidance and Counseling Office
About Us
ALMA MATER HYMN

Lyrics by Atty. Raul S. Roco

Composed by Fr. Benildus Maramba, OSB

 

Herald the Bedans coming
May their fellowship never cease;
Molded by bold, undaunted men
of pray'r, work and peace.

 

Through the carefree days of our childhood
And the visions of our youth
You gave us the wisdom of Benedict's soul
Faith in God and love of the truth.

 

When we encounter trails and hardships,
We shall give you honor and fame,
For nothing but these show our loyalty clear
To our Alma Mater's name.

 

Bring out the challenges, we'll win them all
And fear neither fire nor blood
Bedans will answer the clarions call
For San Beda, our country and God.